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20130201
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and is committed to treaties. that's the purview of the united states senate as the senate passed the new-start treaty. all that goes into that negotiation in this particular case, russia, certainly congress has to be involved in that. >> that is very important, senator hagel. i have to tell you there is unease here that may not be in the works. it has been some discussion for some time about private or unilateral or bilateral conversations that congress is not involved in. that's why this was passed. it was just passed. we expect you to comply with that and i take your testimony that you will comply. >>ly comply with all requirements and laws, absolutely. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> thank you, senator sessions. senator king? >> senator hagel, one of the first meetings i had when i ran for this office last summer was a group of veterans from world war ii all the way up to afghanistan and iraq. one of the things that came up in that meeting is the issue of employability and employment of recent veterans. the suggestion was made that the army and the military has recruiters, people who h
ronald regan and one of the most decorated veterans of vietnam. united states senator. celebrated author. lawyer. and i thought he made a pretty strong, persuasive case. so did many of us. >> let's turn to cybersecurity. i was pleased that you mentioned cyber security in your initial remarks. they have moved expand its cyber security efforts. i have to talk about colorado. the air force academy is well positioned to train those. would you talk a little more on your take on cyber security and what sort of resources we need. >> i've been to those facilities in colorado a few times and don't know as much about them as you do, but i am familiar with them. they are essential to our national security. cyber, i believe represents as big a threat to the security of this country as any one specific threat. for all the reasons this committee understands. it's an insidious quiet, kind of a threat that we have never quite seen before. it can paralyze a nation in a second. not just a power grid or banking system. but it can knock out satellites. it can take down computers on all our carrier battle s
respect the prerogatives of the united states senate and the members of congress, you represent the american people, you're the other branch of government, you have the right to know what took place. and i have an obligation commensurate with the, you know, regulations and classifications and privacy and other things at play here, to help you get the answers and we'll do that. i hope we can do it in a noncontentious, appropriate way. >> thank you. could i just mention, i think you would aee with me that every day that goes by in syria, it gets worse. so there is, it seems to me, a very strong impetus that we realize that the present policy is not succeeding and to look at other options to prevent what is going on for now 22 months and 60,000 dead. >> but i think you would agree with me that whatever judgments you make, they have to pass the test of whether or not, you do them, they're actually going to make things better. >> absolutely. >> you have to make a test of the cost analysis in doing that. and i mean all kinds of cos. human life costs, treasure, effect on other countrie
. and his concerns to budgetary pressures and other pressures facing the united states and its role. senator, thanks a lot. i know it's not easy for you to get here and that's not either. i guess that they too began and a general way asking you, what is the concern? what's worrying you about the possible interaction between limited resources here, pressure to cut the budget and what that might do in terms of limiting u.s. role abroad? >> the consequences of a diminishing pool of resources available and all the fiscal pressures on the congress now in terms of the decisions they make and how to allocate on and the prospects for the future not looking on that. combined with i think it less and less engagement, knowledge of and participation by members of congress and global affairs, whether it is national security, military related or whether it's foreign policy aide related for diplomacy and our presence throughout the world. if you let back -- look back to congress 20, 25 years ago, is essentially made up of people who have the relationship to world war ii and its aftermath in terms of the u.
to you the united states senator designate for massachusetts, mo cowan. [applause] >> thank you, governor. i'm honored and humbled by your action today. i pledge to you and the people the massachusetts that during this interim period, i will go to work every day with the needs and aspirations of our residents foremost in my mind. i know the people of massachusetts care about jobs, education, a portable, high- quality healthcare. i will work with those interests in mind just as you do every day and administration. i accept this temporary post confident in the knowledge and perspective i have acquired working closely with you and the lieutenant governor. you the commonwealth should be assured that i will go to that nation capital ever mindful of what is important to the people of massachusetts. also, congratulations on john kerry to his confirmation and they can for his years of commitment and service to the people of massachusetts. -- thank him for his years of commitment and service to the people of massachusetts. i aim to continue that work in the next coming months. because the work is
adults in the united states annually. health insurance leads to significant benefits and is good for your help. gaining health insurance does not guarantee access to medical care, which is the second part of my testimony, nor does it control costs. the singular intervention we could make of the national level to improve outcomes is to bolster our primary care workforce. there is an additional massive body of literature supporting the idea that primary care improves all sorts of health outcomes and lowers costs. nevertheless, we have not seen systematic changes to abbreviate the shortage in the u.s. in decades. i will talk about three policy levers that i see that this committee could consider to increase the number of physicians entering the primary care work force, some of which have been referred to by professor mollen. at the medical school level, when people graduate from college and are in undergraduate medical training, we could introduce additional debt reduction, change federal funding streams to encourage primary care, and increase funding for the national health service corps. w
of the united states, to expedite this entire process. there is opposition in the senate two comprehensive immigration reform. there is some competition in the house. but i am confident the majority of both houses, led by the president of the united states, who made this a major campaign issue, that we will succeed. we are not going to get everybody on board. >> you mentioned the fact that you have been here before. since 2007, senator kennedy stood with you -- 2007 was the year that you must [inaudible] you have expressed optimism. why is it different? >> as i have stated before elections, the republican party is losing support of our hispanic citizens. we realize there are many issues where everything we are in agreement with our hispanic citizens, but this is a preeminent issue with those citizens. also, over the years, republicans in particular, but also democrats, and all of our citizens, have realized the reality of what all my colleagues just stated. we cannot continue as a nation with the 11 million people residing in the shadows, and we have to address the issue, and it has to be
in the united states and it affects on health and healthcare outcomes and to share my thinking on solutions to to the primary care workforce shortage. there is an enormous literature that has accrued over decades demonstrating that a lack of health insurance is associated with decreased access to healthcare and worse healthcare outcome. subsequent work has built on this evidence. a paper we published in 2009 linking lack of insurance to nearly 45,000 deaths among adults in the u.s. annually. the research is consistent. health insurance leads to significant is tbenefiterss. in an health insurance does not guarantee access to -- at the national level is to bolster our primary care workforce. there is an additional massive body of literature supporting the idea that a primary care improves all sorts of health outcomes and lower costs. he had not seen changes to eliminate the shortage of pcp's in decades. talk about three policy levers that this committee could consider to increase the number of physicians entering into the primary care workforce, some of which have been referred to. at the med
physicians and the united states. we'll show you that tonight. in about 40 minutes, on the floor of the u.s. senate, look for the senate vote on senator john kerry to be the next secretary of state. we expect that at 4:15 eastern. earlier today, a discussion on fact vs. fiction and what israel about the latest film of "zero dark thirty." among those participating, general michael hayden. >> good morning. welcome to aei and this morning's panel, separating fact from fiction. i am a fellow at the american enterprise institute and member of the task force on detention and interrogation policy. kathryn piccolos recent film depicting the operation that killed osama bin laden sparked controversy. -- kathryn bigelow. for the most part of rage of the film has been coming from the left and directed at her. if you were a conservative like me, when you see the hollywood left and washington left, your temptation is to sit back, pop the popcorn and watch the fight. to some extent that is why many of the defenders and supporters stayed out of the debate. why interrupt why they are -- well they are figh
they are on the books. the attorney general of the united states, eric holder, during the richmond program, he called it a cookie cutter approach to solving crime. he did not have a lot of enthusiasm about it. i remember 7 -- senator sessions held a hearing. the department of justice said that a drug dealer with a gun is a guppy and we cannot concentrate on guppies. those studies are what are ruining neighborhoods, destroying lives, and killing people. we've got to confront their behavior and take them off the street. they do not obey by all the laws that we have now. we've got to get real with what works and does not. my problem with background checks is that you are never going to get criminals to go through universal background checks. and of the law-abiding people, you will create an enormous federal theocracy -- bureaucracy, unfunded, and people have to pay the fees, pay the taxes. we do not even prosecute anybody right now that goes through the system we have. we will make all of those law- abiding people go through the system and then we will not prosecute any of the bad guys if they do catch
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10